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Q3 Review

October 28, 2014

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At least its meant to be

October 14, 2014

A crush is a story you tell yourself about the other person. They have no input to that story, they aren’t aware of it. It’s entirely in your head. Being in love is a story you and another person are creating, together.

Or at least its meant to be

Question assumptions

October 8, 2014

Shortcuts are fun. Shortcuts are easy. That’s fine for walking to work, but not for thinking. Intellectual shortcuts mean that you’re not thinking about the brass tacks. You’re not thinking about the foundation of your ideas and theories. It’s intellectual laziness, pure and simple.

Think about why you and other people think a certain way. Consider what factors contribute to conventional wisdom. Do these factors apply to your case? For example, it’s conventional wisdom to buy a house when you have money. But does it really suit your life? What if you’re the nomad type and you want the freedom to pack up your bags and go at a drop of a hat? A house purchase is a great idea if you’re planning to stay somewhere for years.

Analyze the brass tacks yourself. Don’t rely on others to think for you.

Pattern recognition requires high-level abstract thinking. It’s truly seeing forests, not obsessing over individual trees. There’s no one direct route to pattern recognition expertise, so I won’t even try to list them.

There are, however, some universal themes and rules — especially in writing and fiction. If you gather enough knowledge and insights, you may be able to recognize these themes when they arise. Over time, you’ll develop an instinct for pattern recognition. This is an art, not a science. For anyone to achieve pattern recognition skills, one must explore.

As others have said, learn about different viewpoints on a subject. That will help you think about possible angles. No problem has only one angle. It’s your job to find all possible distinctions that you may make.

The best way to test the boundaries of your ideas and issues is to ask what if? This will allow you to understand distinctions. Great thinkers can address ambiguities because they understand that details matter. Details can affect outcomes. it’s just a matter of figuring out which details are important. That’s why it’s important to ask “what if..?”

Labour shouldn’t increase National Insurance contributions to fund the NHS

August 28, 2014

Originally published at http://labourlist.org/2014/08/labour-shouldnt-increase-national-insurance-contributions-to-fund-the-nhs/

What’s safer, more appealing and more likely to guarantee electoral victory than the clinical and antiseptic interpretation of a ComRes survey? Expensive American politicos-for-hire might have a claim to the title. Still, the news that 49% of people would pay more [tax] if the money was going directly to the National Health Service (NHS) should be taken with a daily recommended amount of salt.

NHS_NNUH_entrance

People might say to a nice young surveyor, “Sure, I don’t mind paying a little more tax…” but then these people get into a polling booth and the first thing they feel for are their pockets; first for their wallets, then for a pen to strike against the party that makes their lives ‘easier’. People vote for the party who elicits the right feelings, not the party who presents the best arguments.

The public may be sceptical about a tax increase, even though it could have an immediate and significant role in reducing the NHS’ funding gap, and keep the NHS free at the point of need. It has been well documented that the NHS is facing a serious funding gap if demand continues to increase and budgets remain frozen – up to £30bn by 2021 according to NHS England. Surely, people chiefly need to feel like they are getting value for money from the nation’s beloved institution and that Labour can deal with its problems.

The shadow health secretary Andy Burnham has been working hard to demonstrate causation between problems in the NHS and the increasing use of the private sector. However, voters don’t really care about the politics of NHS funding. They want to be able to see a GP, get hospital appointments in reasonable times and have their operation(s) quickly and safely.

Just attacking the privatisation element of the NHS can paint future ministers into tight corners so perhaps the Labour message should shift away from the fiscal management side of things. The Mid-Staffs episode was a dark period in the history of the NHS, but rightfully, the Conservative propaganda has largely failed to have any imprint on the wider public. So, the NHS continues to be one of Labour’s trump cards, firmly standing as an area people regard the Labour party strong on. Tinkering with tax to keep the NHS going as it is, may not necessarily elicit the right feelings with the general public. Surely, there are other fronts worth fighting on.

Well, at least the Labour party is going out of its way to convince the electorate that they’re fiscally prudent and are not rushing into any spending decisions. However, we have a National Health Service not a National Hospital Service and entertaining NI tax talk threatens to deepen mistrust in politicians and undermine public confidence in the welfare state. Furthermore, what of all the other state services? If all that new NI revenue is just for NHS spending, then wouldn’t Labour still end up implementing the coalition’s plans to cut public services?

The Labour party should try not indulging ‘A penny on National Insurance for the NHS’, mainly because such taxes are unprincipled and unfair in an era of cuts and because frankly, National Insurance is one of the worst taxes with which to fund the NHS. Why focus on a tax that only hits wages, to the exclusion of other capital income streams like dividends and rent? Why would the Labour party, the party founded by the working-class, shift taxation more towards earned income rather than capital? Why suggest an increase in a tax paid by people aged under 65 (and employers) even though a majority of NHS spending goes to the elderly, the main users of the NHS? Oh yes, forgot, it’s because they vote right?

What’s more, NI incentivises the use of zero-hour contracts and will further incentivise employers to replace full time jobs with multiple part-time jobs. Which although will be of some benefit to some, may be of detriment and unsustainability to more. And again, does it elicit the right feelings when it comes to Labour’s overarching message?

Sure, the key concern is solving the NHS’ funding crises, but this needs to be done in a way that fits well with Labour’s 2015 narrative. Most people might prefer to pay £10 to see a GP than 1% extra NI that could cost an extra £500 per year. Disclaimer: That was a crude back of the envelope calculation, but not too dissimilar to the one people might do in the pooling booth were they voting tomorrow.

In any event, an ‘NHS Tax’ would never last long really, as a Labour government might not be able to resist taking the money into the central pot for over things. On one hand, it pays for Labour to confront the issue now rather than deal with something unexpected if and when it party forms a government. On the other, people vote for the party who elicits the right feelings, not the party who presents the best arguments.

Picture that. Book it

August 22, 2014

Our earliest years are spent, without our ever acknowledging or being aware of the process, learning to communicate and form relationships. Then, when children enter the educational realm, they begin perfecting those skills and gradually begin to acknowledge and embrace how to communicate and form relationships – and what works best for them.

Effective communication can be achieved in many ways, whether it’s through an astute command of language; an intuitive grasp of the underlying meaning of another’s spoken or written words; the ability to use a combination of words, facial expressions, gestures and other means to convey understanding; or through the unspoken and unseen energetic communication transmitted through the electromagnetic fields that all living things generate. You know “vibes”.

Carved in stone at the entrance of a school founded by Plato were the words of his teacher, Socrates: “Know thyself.”

A relationship is a connection and exchange between people. Communication plays a large role in the exchange between people. It exchanges information in the form of ideas, wants, desires, feelings, and much more. Incomplete or stopped communication can create a block in the relationship. The degree of the block can vary with the severity or repeating of the communication stop. A block in the relationship exists or will grow when communication is just flat out avoided.

A communication avoidance or stop will prevent that topic from being shared and gone through. When enough of these areas build up or a couple important ones develop, it behaves as if there were clamps on the lungs of the relationship. The relationship has trouble breathing. Without this exchange of life energy, the relationship cannot grow, it may struggle, and if it is severe enough, then the relationship suffers and dies.

Relying on mind-reading to get your needs fulfilled creates feelings of chronic anger and contempt towards someone, conditions which will almost invariably lead to the demise of a relationship. Don’t cheat yourself. If it’s important for you to talk, expect nothing less. Your happiness relies on it. You deserve stories and not sentences. You deserve to give each other the best of yourselves.

Developing and Managing the Service Redesign

August 14, 2014

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High Impact Thought

July 8, 2014

One High Impact Change – the integration imperative Ade Adeyemi

kopfadeyemi.files.wordpress.com 2014 07 one high impact change the integration imperative ade adeyemi.pdf

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